Welcome to the BMTInfonet Drug Database

This guide lists many of the drugs bone marrow, stem cell and cord blood transplants patients receive during treatment. It explains why they are used and some, but not allAcute lymphoblastic leukemia., of the possible side effects.

This guide should not be used as a substitute for a detailed discussion with your doctor and pharmacist about drugs you are being given. If you experience any side effect after taking the drug, even if they are not noted below, consult your doctor immediately.

Some of the drugs in this guide are also used outside the transplant setting. The descriptions of the drugs in this guide pertain only to their use in bone marrow, stem cell or cord blood transplantation.

If you are searching for a drug used by transplant patients and survivors that is not in this database, please contact us at drugdata@bmtinfonet.org.

This database was compiled under the direction of pharmacists knowledgeable about transplantation, but should not be construed as medical advice. Consult your doctor for information about how each drug might affect you.

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Acyclovir


Trade Names: 
Zovirax®

Possible Uses: 
Prevent and treat viral infections, e.g. herpes infections.

Special Notes: 
Available in tablet and injectable form

Drug Interactions: 
Varicella Virus Vaccine- may result in decreased effectiveness

Possible Side Effects: 
Diarrhea, headache, nausea, dizziness, rash, fatigue, change in kidney function, vein irritation, confusion, change in liver function.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Allopurinol


Trade Names: 
Zyloprim®

Possible Uses: 
Decreases uric acid that is released when chemotherapy drugs kill tumor cells, protects against kidney damage. Also decreases gout.

Possible Side Effects: 
Fever, chills, drowsiness, nausea vomiting, increased liver function tests, and rash. Rarely, causes a severe rash that progresses to severe burn-like condition called Stevens-Johnson syndrome. May decrease blood cell counts.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Azithromycin


Trade Names: 
Zithromax®
Trade Names: 
Z-Pak®

Possible Uses: 
Treat or prevent infection.

Drug Interactions: 
Interferes with many drugs metabolized by the liver. May be toxic to the heart when used with quinidine. Do not take with calcium supplements or antacids.

Possible Side Effects: 
Diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, heart beat irregularity, rash.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Daclizumab


Trade Names: 
Zenapax®

Possible Uses: 
In allogeneic transplantation, an investigational drug used to treat or prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD).

Special Notes: 
This is a monoclonal antibody. Let your doctor know if you have ever had a monoclonal antibody before.

Possible Side Effects: 
Rash, fever, chills, an increased risk of infection.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Linezolid


Trade Names: 
Zyvox®

Possible Uses: 
Antibiotic used for the treatment of resistant gram-positive infections (e.g. vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium - VRE)

Drug Interactions: 
Avoid alcohol and tyramine containing foods

Possible Side Effects: 
nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, altered taste, insomnia, dizziness, rash, headache, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Ondansetron


Trade Names: 
Zofran®

Possible Uses: 
Prevent or treat nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery.

Possible Side Effects: 
Headache, dizziness, fever, constipation, diarrhea.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Piperacillin /Tazobactam


Trade Names: 
Zosyn®

Possible Uses: 
Prevent or treat bacterial infections.

Possible Side Effects: 
Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, bleeding problems, change in kidney or liver function. If patient is allergic, may cause swollen face, throat or lips, breathing difficulties. May also cause a superinfection such as vaginal fungal infection.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

Ranitidine


Trade Names: 
Zantac®

Possible Uses: 
Reduce acid in the stomach, treat or prevent ulcers and reflux.

Possible Side Effects: 
Headache, dizziness, diarrhea, constipation, rash.
Last updated on 02/01/2010

zoledronic acid


Trade Names: 
Zometa®
Trade Names: 
Reclast®

Possible Uses: 
Used to treat high calcium levels due to malignancy. Other uses include preventing/treating metastatic bone lesions for multiple myeloma patients and patients with solid tumors. Recently approved for treatment of osteoporosis

Special Notes: 
Patients should be taking a daily calcium supplement and multivitamin containing Vitamin D (if dietary intake is inadequate)

Drug Interactions: 
Thalidomide, and Ibuprofen type drugs, may increase the effects of zoledronic acid.

Possible Side Effects: 
Acute reaction within 3 days: fever, muscle or bone aches, flu-like symptoms. Leg edema, hypotension, fatigue, headache, dizziness, insomnia, hair loss, rash, nausea, constipation, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, low white blood count, anemia, bone pain, weakness, decreased renal function.
Last updated on 02/01/2010
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